51 - 60 of 158 articles

Why Are We Still Spanking Our Kids?

Why Are We Still Spanking Our Kids?

In this blog post we discuss legal, attitudinal and motivational factors that explain why we use physical punishment with children, specifically: (1) the United States, unlike most other countries, does not legislate against it, (2) attitudes condoning corporal punishment remain strong, particularly in some U.S. regions and cultures, (3) situational precipitating factors, impulsive appraisal, and cognitive scripts for aggressive punishment can interact to result in a spanking episode. / more

Consensual non-monogamy: Table for more than two, please

Consensual non-monogamy: Table for more than two, please

Admit it:  We have crushes, we have sexual fantasies, and sometimes we want to act on them—even when those crushes and fantasies aren’t about our current romantic partner.  Most of the time, we ignore these crushes and our fantasies go unfulfilled.  For some, cheating seems like an option.  However, for others, it is totally okay to pursue these crushes and fantasies outside a relationship.  Welcome to the emerging movement to rewrite the rules of romance: consensual... / more

An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology. Proccesses and Disorders

An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology. Proccesses and Disorders

When I started incorporating cognitive paradigms into my research, I was looking for a book that would allow me to quickly navigate through cognitive theories and refresh my knowledge acquired in undergraduate cognitive psychology course. I was glad to find ”An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology” edited by David Groome and colleagues. / more

From candidate genes to genome-wide association studies

From candidate genes to genome-wide association studies

In my last post I asked where the genes for psychological traits are, and argued that over the last two decades candidate gene studies have failed to identify genes that are reliably associated with complex behavioral phenotypes. In this post, I will discuss more recent whole genome methods, such as genome-wide association studies, and what we have learned from these. / more

No strings attached: Are “friends with benefits” as complicated in real life as they are in the movies?

No strings attached: Are “friends with benefits” as complicated in real life as they are in the movies?

Many people become “friends with benefits” to avoid drama and to have sex without getting tied up in emotions; however, the reality is that having a friend with benefits often becomes complicated. Why is that, and is there anything you can do to avoid these complexities? In this article, we will explore the science behind friends who decide to have sex.

 “No relationship. No emotions. Just ...

/ more

Now I ain’t sayin she’s a gold digger, but will she get with someone who makes less than her, either?

Now I ain’t sayin she’s a gold digger, but will she get with someone who makes less than her, either?

In this post I review research showing that women do not care about partner’s income as much as people may think. In fact, the research suggests that both men and women overestimate the degree to which the other gender cares about money in relationships. These findings are particularly relevant given that some opponents of the 2014 U.S. Paycheck Fairness Act have stated that women prefer to make less money than their romantic partners. / more

Bullying in the workplace

Bullying in the workplace

Organization-motivated aggression like retaliatory behavior and antisocial conduct designed to harass, ostracize, humiliate (verbally and non-verbally), and eliminate any employee who is perceived to have ethical standards or raises an ethical concern that might become a problem for management could be classified as a bullying behavior. Human resources departments are designed to protect management and can easily be drawn into becoming the “Bully” who is hiding behind his or her legal jargon in order to lynch and attack targeted employees. / more

Learning from our dreams

Learning from our dreams

In this post, I describe how dreams are associated with people’s behavior after waking up, especially in the context of their close relationships. Have you ever felt upset at someone after what they did in your dream? There are several theories to explain how and why this happens, along with some references to Friends and The Matrix. / more

Moonwalking with Einstein: the art and science of remembering everything.

Moonwalking with Einstein: the art and science of remembering everything.

In an attempt to find “the world’s smartest person”, Foer ends up as a visitor at the USA Memory Championship whose contestants easily memorize 250 random digits in under five minutes and are able to learn the order of a shuffled card deck in less than two. However, when Foer asks some of the contestants about their “savant skills”, all of them point out that their memory is in fact “quite average” and that their superior performance is the product of “simple” memory training techniques – which can be learned by anyone. Fuelled by this, Foer starts his own Ebbinghausian self-experiment when he decides to become a “mental athlete” himself. Coached by one of the contestants, Foer begins to train his memory to take part in the oncoming USA Memory Championship. / more

Only searching for a plane? What the disappearance of Flight MH 370 reveals about the human need for meaning and certainty

Only searching for a plane? What the disappearance of Flight MH 370 reveals about the human need for meaning and certainty

In this post, I describe how two core motives of human social behavior—the need for understanding and the need for control—shape people’s responses to disaster. Using the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 as an example, I describe how people seek to maintain meaning (related to understanding) and to re-establish certainty (related to control) after unforeseen disasters. / more

filter options

Article (115)
Blog Post (73)
Book Review (38)

facebook