Sex versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of Sabina Spielrein

Sex versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of Sabina Spielrein

The following review incorporates answers from Dr. John Launer, from an interview I conducted with him over email. I have included them within my review where appropriate, as I felt they added a new dimension to my own subjective thoughts.    To summarize, "Sex versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of SABINA SPIELREIN" is the biography of Sabina Spielrein, a scientist at the turn of the 20th century whose life and ideas... / more

overall
5 of 5
novelty
5 of 5
readability
5 of 5

The Power of Others

The Power of Others

The majority of people perceive themselves as individual thinkers who make their own decisions and formulate their personal opinions independent of others. Could this perception be far from the truth?                                                                                                Are most of our decisions predetermined by others? Is free choice an illusion created... / more

overall
4 of 5
novelty
3 of 5
readability
4 of 5

A Mind For Numbers. How To Excel At Math And Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra).

A Mind For Numbers. How To Excel At Math And Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra).

When I first started to teach myself how to program, I self-diagnosed myself with dysprogrammeria - a natural inability to understand any computer language. No matter how much time and effort I invested, I could not stretch my brain enough to understand all the new concepts. I was glad to find out that the author of “A Mind For Numbers. How To Excel At Math And Science (Even If You Flunked Algebra)”, Barbara A. Oakley, must have felt similar when she first started learning engineering at the age of 23. However, she decided to take classes in engineering and 30 years later, as a professor of mechanical engineering, she is sharing her experience of how to rewire a “humanistic brain” into a “technical brain”. / more

overall
5 of 5
novelty
4 of 5
readability
5 of 5

Handbook of Social Resource Theory: Theoretical Extensions, Empirical Insights, and Social Applications

Handbook of Social Resource Theory: Theoretical Extensions, Empirical Insights, and Social Applications

The "Handbook of Social Resource Theory: Theoretical Extensions, Empirical Insights, and Social Applications", put together by Kjell Törnblom and Ali Kazemi, presents a wonderful selection of scholarly articles on the topic of Resource Theory, including much cutting-edge research by distinguished scientists. It is the successful attempt to provide an overview and reference volume for individuals who might be interested in uncovering the patterns behind human interactions and exchanges. / more

overall
5 of 5
novelty
4 of 5
readability
5 of 5

An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology. Proccesses and Disorders

An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology. Proccesses and Disorders

When I started incorporating cognitive paradigms into my research, I was looking for a book that would allow me to quickly navigate through cognitive theories and refresh my knowledge acquired in undergraduate cognitive psychology course. I was glad to find ”An Introduction to Cognitive Psychology” edited by David Groome and colleagues. / more

overall
4 of 5
novelty
3 of 5
readability
5 of 5

Bullying in the workplace

Bullying in the workplace

Organization-motivated aggression like retaliatory behavior and antisocial conduct designed to harass, ostracize, humiliate (verbally and non-verbally), and eliminate any employee who is perceived to have ethical standards or raises an ethical concern that might become a problem for management could be classified as a bullying behavior. Human resources departments are designed to protect management and can easily be drawn into becoming the “Bully” who is hiding behind his or her legal jargon in order to lynch and attack targeted employees. / more

overall
5 of 5
novelty
4 of 5
readability
5 of 5

Moonwalking with Einstein: the art and science of remembering everything.

Moonwalking with Einstein: the art and science of remembering everything.

In an attempt to find “the world’s smartest person”, Foer ends up as a visitor at the USA Memory Championship whose contestants easily memorize 250 random digits in under five minutes and are able to learn the order of a shuffled card deck in less than two. However, when Foer asks some of the contestants about their “savant skills”, all of them point out that their memory is in fact “quite average” and that their superior performance is the product of “simple” memory training techniques – which can be learned by anyone. Fuelled by this, Foer starts his own Ebbinghausian self-experiment when he decides to become a “mental athlete” himself. Coached by one of the contestants, Foer begins to train his memory to take part in the oncoming USA Memory Championship. / more

overall
4 of 5
novelty
3 of 5
readability
5 of 5

What makes Olga run?: The mystery of the 90-something track star and what she can teach us about living longer, happier lives.

What makes Olga run?: The mystery of the 90-something track star and what she can teach us about living longer, happier lives.

What Makes Olga Run is an engaging, informative and inspiring read about the international track star Olga Kotelko. At the time of the writing of the book, Olga was holding 26 world records, and had over 600 medals won at throwing, sprint, and jump events. This is quite impressive, but here is where things get really interesting: Olga is 95 years old currently, and she has taken up track-and-field at the age of 77! When award-winning Canadian writer Bruce Grierson met the astonishingly young-looking Olga a couple years ago, he had the same question that Olga awakens in many: “Seriously: When you’re breaking records, rather than hips, at an age most people will never live to see … what gives?” At his physical and mental nadir at that point in his life, Grierson decided to follow Olga and learn from her as much as possible about living healthier and happier, longer and better. The result is this book, which perfectly blends Olga’s life story with the latest on the science of optimal aging. / more

overall
4 of 5
novelty
4 of 5
readability
5 of 5

Social: why our brains are wired to connect.

Social: why our brains are wired to connect.

Humans have large brains. According to the social brain hypothesis, proposed by Robin Dunbar, the social environment played a large role in the evolution of the human brain’s structure and function. Today, typing “the social brain” in google scholar results in more than 10.000 hits. More than half of those hits refer to papers or books published since 2010. Conclusion: the social brain is a “hot” term in psychology. In his book “Social: Why our brains are wired to connect” Matthew Lieberman outlines his view on why we have a social brain, and how our social brain processes the world around us. Applying his view more broadly, he also explains what having a social brain may mean in dealing with social issues such as education, work and building social connections. / more

overall
4 of 5
novelty
5 of 5
readability
5 of 5

The curse of lovely: How to break free from the demands of others and learn to say no

The curse of lovely: How to break free from the demands of others and learn to say no

Reading a self-help book is like talking to a stranger in a bar – you either identify with the person’s story immediately and feel like you can talk the whole night or you don’t, which is when you try to move to another table. Regarding Jacqui Marson’s book “The Curse of Lovely” I felt similar. After reading the first chapter I couldn’t fully identify myself with the author’s personal story so I was tempted to classify the book as “not for me”. And as can happen in a bar, when a person you didn’t like at first becomes a friend, my first impression of “The Curse of Lovely” turned out to be wrong after I continued reading it for a while. I found myself identifying with the problems and nodding approvingly more and more often. / more

overall
4 of 5
novelty
3 of 5
readability
5 of 5

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