1 - 10 of 256 articles

No Excuses! Lay Judges Reject Exhaustion as a Reason for Failing to Help Others

No Excuses! Lay Judges Reject Exhaustion as a Reason for Failing to Help Others

Imagine that your spouse has promised that they will wash the dishes cluttering your sink this evening; but, when they arrive home exhausted after a stressful day of back-to-back meetings and skipped meals, they try to pawn the responsibility back off on you. Would you soften your judgment of your spouse on account of their fatigue?

We find that the court of moral opinion is unsympathetic to the exhausted: Across several studies, we found that people judged... / more

Social Machines: Social Aspects of Human-Computer Interaction

Social Machines: Social Aspects of Human-Computer Interaction

Have you ever experienced the frustration of your computer not behaving as it should? Maybe it started to reboot during your most important meeting, or it simply froze and despite your best efforts, you couldn’t restart it. Take a moment to recall your reactions: how did you feel and behave? Did you mutter angry half-sentences? Did you shout at the machine in frustration? Did you threaten it that you will buy a new, better...

/ more

Understanding Online Child Sexual Abuse and How to Talk to Children About it

Understanding Online Child Sexual Abuse and How to Talk to Children About it

The new digital technology provides children with endless opportunities to explore and communicate. Still, it is important to prepare them for potential risks that they might encounter online, just as we prepare them for potential risks in the offline environment. In this article, you will learn how to create a safer online environment by talking to children about the internet and online sexual abuse.

On a cold winter morning in March 2013, a 13-year-old girl committed...

/ more

Risk assessment tools and criminal reoffending: Does bias determine who is “high risk”?

Risk assessment tools and criminal reoffending: Does bias determine who is “high risk”?

In The Netherlands in 1993, a man named Thomas was convicted of an arson in which no one was injured. Thomas was sentenced to four years in prison and involuntary treatment in a secure mental health facility. Based solely on professional opinion, Thomas was deemed too dangerous for release. If risk assessment tools had been available and used to evaluate Thomas, he would likely have been deemed a low risk to reoffend [1]. On the other...

/ more

The Coddling of the American Mind, reviewed by Dylan Selterman

The Coddling of the American Mind, reviewed by Dylan Selterman

 In their new book, The Coddling of the American Mind, Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt are sounding an alarm about a rising trend of emotional fragility in American culture.  Specifically, they explain how this fragility manifests on university and college campuses, to the detriment of learning, academic freedom, discourse, and debate. The Coddling is an important and timely book, as our society is dealing with extremely challenging problems, and we will...

/ more

My Year of Rest and Relaxation, reviewed by Andrew Archer

My Year of Rest and Relaxation, reviewed by Andrew Archer

“There she is, a human being, diving into the unknown, and she is wide awake.” (p. 289)

 A Buddhist Analysis of My Year of Rest and Relaxation by Ottessa Moshfegh 

Ottessa Moshfegh’s 2018 novel—My Year of Rest and Relaxation—is written as a retrospective, reflection of the narrator’s former self. The characters and details of the story are a critique of Western psychology—including psychiatry—and American culture. Buddhist philosophy is applied to analyze the narrator’s mission... / more

The Quelling, reviewed by Katharine Coldiron

The Quelling, reviewed by Katharine Coldiron

Debut Novel Explores and Explodes Attachment Therapy

Barbara Barrow’s intriguing new novel, The Quelling (Lanternfish Press, September 25) explores a psychological treatment called attachment therapy. Although this innocuous name connects to attachment theory, which is legitimate, attachment therapy is controversial and dangerous, as the novel demonstrates ably. In The Quelling, two sisters, Addie and Dorian, are placed in a treatment facility as children and forced to...

/ more

Roadblocks to Mental Health Research

Roadblocks to Mental Health Research

Another busy ward round: a telephone rings; a nurse apologises to patients that the ward is too short-staffed to facilitate their leave this afternoon; a junior doctor furiously types up their notes whilst simultaneously explaining to a healthcare assistant how to check the observation charts; there is a strong... / more

How to get into shape like the Hulk

How to get into shape like the Hulk

Do you want to get into shape but find it hard to carry out your good intentions? The Hulk can help you!

After summer vacation, chances are you are trying to get back into shape. Your goals may include fitting into your pants again, training for a 5k in the winter, or improving your overall physical strength and endurance. Each day you try to start off with a proper breakfast and intend to...

/ more

The Effect of Acute Stress on Memory: How It Helps and How It Hurts

The Effect of Acute Stress on Memory: How It Helps and How It Hurts

Although we often perceive the effect of stress negatively, research suggests that stress effects are not always detrimental. This review paper examines the impact that acute stress has on memory formation and retrieval by highlighting the ways that stress can help improve memory, but also the ways in which it typically harms memory. This paper focuses on the neurobiology behind the stress response, the ways in which researchers typically examine...

/ more

filter options

Article (128)
Blog Post (89)
Book Review (42)

facebook