Roadblocks to Mental Health Research

Roadblocks to Mental Health Research

Another busy ward round: a telephone rings; a nurse apologises to patients that the ward is too short-staffed to facilitate their leave this afternoon; a junior doctor furiously types up their notes whilst simultaneously explaining to a healthcare assistant how to check the observation charts; there is a strong smell of coffee and the telephone continues ringing, unanswered. With the day-today demands of healthcare, it is often challenging to also implement research. However, mental health problems are one of the... / more

How to get into shape like the Hulk

How to get into shape like the Hulk

Do you want to get into shape but find it hard to carry out your good intentions? The Hulk can help you! After summer vacation, chances are you are trying to get back into shape. Your goals may include fitting into your pants again, training for a 5k in the winter, or improving your overall physical strength and endurance. Each day you try to start off with a proper breakfast and intend to do a workout session in the evening... / more

Call for Blogs and Bloggers

Call for Blogs and Bloggers

Call for Blogs and Bloggers: In-Mind Magazine We invite you to submit a blog (1,000 words or less) for In-Mind Magazine, the flagship online journal of the In-Mind Foundation. In-Mind Magazine is a peer-reviewed online journal that publishes short reviews of topics in all fields of psychology. Our outlet is unique—articles are written for a broad audience, and intended to inform the general public about psychological trends and research. Our blog section at In-Mind complements our peer-reviewed articles and includes... / more

Doing ill for ‘the greater good’: Understanding what really went on in the Stanford Prison Experiment

Doing ill for ‘the greater good’: Understanding what really went on in the Stanford Prison Experiment

Just about every highschool and college psychology textbook offers extensive coverage of Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE). The meaning of the SPE seemed obvious — that when given roles with power , people naturally become brutal tyrants. This message has had lasting influence, not only in psychology but in the world at large. However, after researchers have recently gained access to the SPE archives, it has come to light that much of what we thought we knew about the study... / more

Wait, What?! The Stanford Prison Experiment was pre-tested?

Wait, What?! The Stanford Prison Experiment was pre-tested?

With the recent news regarding the questionable nature of the infamous Stanford Prison Experiment, we thought it was purdent to republish one of our earlier blog articles drawing attention to the issue. The piece below appeared on our blog in 2012. A blogpost by the Neurocritic suggests that the infamous Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) was based on a pre-test in which participants behaved equally cruel. Job van Wolferen summarizes this post and highlights another disturbing point the Neurocritic raises: the... / more

The Violence We Have Committed

The Violence We Have Committed

Circle of Willis is a podcast series from Associate Professor and Clinical Psychologist Dr. James Coan. The podcast features interviews with many of today's top social scientists, journalists, authors, and more. In a recent special episode of Circle of Willis, Dr. Coan speaks with five developmental scientists about what may be happening to the children who are currently being separated from their parents as part of a policy to deter immigration and asylum seekers at the southern border to the... / more

Chemical or Financial Imbalances? Mental Health, Income Inequality & American Culture

Chemical or Financial Imbalances? Mental Health, Income Inequality & American Culture

As societies become more unequal, the prevalence of all forms of mental illness increase—in part—due to the perception of extreme differences in status. The rise of mood disorders is caused by our social immersion in a digital culture—built and shaped via individualistic values—which is the financial machine for perpetuating income inequality. Psychiatry is reliant on a decontextualized, ahistorical, brain-based understanding of mental disorders to garner wide-spread acceptance of biological solutions (i.e., psychotropic medication). Psychological disorder however, may manifest via financial... / more

Demystifying Mental Health...On the Radio! An interview with podcast host Hillary McBride

Demystifying Mental Health...On the Radio! An interview with podcast host Hillary McBride

“I like to tell people when I start working with them that I’m a therapist because therapy has changed my life. As a therapist, I know what it’s like to be on both sides of the couch." Normally, therapy sessions are totally confidential — but a new podcast from the CBC opens the doors. Hillary McBride and her clients want to help demystify mental health. No actors. No auditions. No artifice. In-Mind sat down with Hillary, a therapist and Ph.D... / more

Does social media usage really make people miserable? Fact-checking claims about the psychology of Facebook

Does social media usage really make people miserable? Fact-checking claims about the psychology of Facebook

There’s been a lot of talk in the news recently about Facebook, and much of the discussion has centered on Facebook’s role in politics and journalism and user privacy. But there are other discussions about Facebook’s product itself, focusing on users’ well-being and psychological health . Specifically, some political commentators are making somewhat inaccurate and exaggerated claims about the psychology of Facebook—that it’s unhealthy, making users feel depressed and/or lonely. It’s important that we think critically about this topic, so... / more

In-Mind Selected as a Top Psychology Blog!

In-Mind Selected as a Top Psychology Blog!

In-Mind Magazine was selected by Feedspot as one of the top 15 psychology blogs on the web! https://blog.feedspot.com/social_psychology_blogs/ / more