Experienced researcher looking for a different challenge? You could be our next Chief Editor!

Experienced researcher looking for a different challenge? You could be our next Chief Editor!

The In-Mind Foundation is soliciting applications and nominations for a chief editor for the International In-Mind Magazine, starting as soon as possible. Description of the Magazine In-Mind Magazine is a leading Open Access magazine that aims to communicate psychological science to a general audience. We publish peer-reviewed research review articles intended for a broad (non-academic) audience. We specialize in all sub-disciplines of psychology (including social/personality, developmental, cognitive, clinical, biopsychology, school, applied, etc.). Working with In-Mind means you will be collaborating... / more

Adverse Childhood Experiences and its lifelong consequences

Adverse Childhood Experiences and its lifelong consequences

Unfortunately, some children grow up with maltreatment and household dysfunction. In this post, I will explain how these adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) not only have a negative influence during childhood, but later on in life as well, and I will give some advice about how to prevent these long-lasting negative outcomes. / more

Marginal and Happy – How can people be culturally detached and well adjusted?

Marginal and Happy – How can people be culturally detached and well adjusted?

Belonging to several cultural groups at the same time can be associated with complex feelings of group membership. In this post, I will provide an explanation for the phenomenon whereby many immigrants marginalize—feel detached from the mainstream culture they live in and the heritage culture they grew up in—while feeling happy. / more

Are conservatives really simple-minded?

Are conservatives really simple-minded?

The current consensus in psychology is that political conservatives are uniquely simple-minded. Indeed, even the famous critic of political bias and Heterodox contributor Jonathan Haidt (and colleagues) suggested that there is a “consistent difference between liberals and conservatives” on several measurements related to cognitive complexity (Joseph, Graham, & Haidt, 2009, p. 176). / more

Foetus or child? Language and attitudes toward abortion

Foetus or child? Language and attitudes toward abortion

Due to moral, religious and cultural sensibilities, the topic of abortion still gives rise to controversy in many countries. In this post, I will discuss our research showing how language used in abortion discourse can affect people’s attitudes by changing their attributions of humanity to unborn (Mikołajczak & Bilewicz, 2015). / more

Refugees work placement: Call for collaboration

Refugees work placement: Call for collaboration

In the Netherlands only, more than 25.000 refugees arrived this year, and the numbers are rapidly increasing. One of the biggest challenges for refugees is to acclimatize, adapt, and find jobs in a new country. As a group of behavioral change experts, we want to help them, but we need some expert collaborators. This is a call for collaboration with a programmer, translator, and refugee organizations. / more

Empathy and prejudice after attacks in Paris and Beirut

Empathy and prejudice after attacks in Paris and Beirut

In this blog, I will try to explain why we showed more empathy for victims in Paris than in Beirut, and how feelings of fear after such a terrorist attack can lead to prejudice against out-groups, especially against Muslims. / more

The cross-cultural psychology of Internet privacy concern

The cross-cultural psychology of Internet privacy concern

In a recent cross-cultural study of Facebook users in Japan and the US, I show that Japanese SNS users are more concerned about Internet privacy than American SNS users. And it turns out that because Americans have higher general trust, they less likely to believe that a stranger would take advantage of their private information, should it be leaked online. / more

Patriot Acts: Why the USA’s recent decrease in national glorification might be a good sign

Patriot Acts: Why the USA’s recent decrease in national glorification might be a good sign

In this blog post, I share a recent report which says that Americans are less fervent about their country now than they’ve been in the recent past. However, I also review some political psychology research on different styles of patriotism which suggests that this particular type of decrease might actually be a good thing for Americans. / more

Look at me! (Or don’t): Of society and showing off on Facebook

Look at me! (Or don’t): Of society and showing off on Facebook

Shameless self-promotion on Facebook. Love it or hate it, there’s always someone doing it. And many of us are guilty of it. But why do we do it? Comparing Facebook users in the US and Japan, I suggest it’s the power of the social context that may determine who struts their stuff, and why. / more