Jay Wood

Jay Wood

Jay is an Associate Editor for In-Mind and a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at the Auckland University of Technology in New Zealand. He received his MA and PhD in Social Psychology from Queen's University, Canada, under the supervision of Leandre Fabrigar. His research explores theories of persuasion and attitude change, as well as how and when attitudes shape behaviour. To learn more about Jay's work, check out his website. Jay also coordinates the book review section for In-Mind.

Hannah Nohlen

Hannah Nohlen

Hannah Nohlen received her Master’s degree in Behavioural Science from Radboud University Nijmegen. Since the beginning of 2010 she is a PhD student at the Social Psychology Department at the University of Amsterdam, where she works together with Frenk van Harreveld, Mark Rotteveel, and Joop van der Pligt. Her PhD project focuses on ambivalent decision-making and choice conflicts. E-mail: h.nohlen@in-mind.org

Carina Giesen

Carina Giesen

Carina Giesen studied psychology at the University of Jena, Germany and at the University of Glasgow, UK. She received her psychology diploma (German equivalent to M.Sc. degree) in 2009. Since then, she is a PhD student at the Department of General Psychology II at the University of Jena, and works together with Klaus Rothermund. Her PhD thesis focuses on principles of stimulus-response binding and retrieval (i.e., processes of behavior automatization). Her main research focus is therefore in cognitive psychology, but she is also interested in a lot of topics that relate to social, social-cognitive, and other experimental psychological issues. E-mail: c.giesen@in-mind.org

Pelin Kesebir

Pelin Kesebir

Pelin Kesebir, Ph.D., is a social psychologist who is currently a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Her research explores different aspects of existential human motivation and their implications for individual and societal well-being. E-mail: p.kesebir@in-mind.org

Helen Boucher

Helen Boucher

Helen Boucher received her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley and is currently an Associate Professor at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. Broadly, her research interests concern social influences on the self. Specific projects include how self-knowledge, self-evaluation, and self-regulation are impacted by culture, important relationship partners, and threats to meaning systems such as uncertainty and mortality salience. E-mail: h.boucher@in-mind.org

Richard Skaff

Richard Skaff

Richard Skaff is a Clinical Psychologist and the author of two books. He also wrote dozens of articles on a variety of important topics, and reviewed hundreds of significant books on a cornucopia of subjects. He also developed a novel approach to couples’ psychotherapy called “Power Psychotherapy” to help struggling couples restore their broken relationships. E-mail: r.skaff@in-mind.org

Jens Hellmann

Jens Hellmann

Jens H. Hellmann received his Diploma in Psychology from the University of Bielefeld and his PhD from Jacobs University Bremen. Presently, he is working in a project on psychological aspects of refugee integration at the University of Münster. His research mainly deals with social cognitive processes and elaboration in higher education. Jens started reading when he was a child and even today, he still uses this skill from time to time. E-mail: j.hellmann@in-mind.org

Irena Domachowska

Irena Domachowska

Irena Domachowska received her M.A. in psychology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poland. She has completed the Research Masters in Social Psychology at the VU University, The Netherlands. She is currently pursuing her PhD at the TU Dresden, Germany. E-mail: i.domachowska@in-mind.org

Suzanne Oosterwijk

Suzanne Oosterwijk

Suzanne Oosterwijk received her Ph.D. from the University of Amsterdam. After working as a postdoc at Northeastern University in Boston for three years, she is now back at the University of Amsterdam. One of her main research interests is how the brain constructs emotion. More specifically, she studies how neural systems implement the interaction between concepts and bodily states to produce emotion experience and emotion understanding. Recently, she started to investigate morbid curiosity: the phenomenon that people regularly approach and explore highly intense negative stimuli. E-mail: s.oosterwijk@in-mind.org

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