61 - 70 of 248 articles

Does it matter if people are aware of their implicit racial bias?

Does it matter if people are aware of their implicit racial bias?

In this blog post, I discuss how people respond to information about their implicit racial bias—automatic attitudes and beliefs that favor one ethnic group over another. Although people can be defensive, emerging research suggests there are benefits to accepting implicit racial bias and being aware of this subtle prejudice. / more

Yielding to temptation: How and why some people are better at controlling themselves

Yielding to temptation: How and why some people are better at controlling themselves

Have you ever found yourself eating a tempting chocolate cake, although you want to lose a few pounds? Have you ever found yourself watching television, although you planned to work on an important but maybe boring project that day? Did you ever procrastinate with submitting your tax declaration, preferring to go to a hockey game that night? Or did you ever catch yourself flirting with another person, although you feel...
/ more

Complex Dilemmas in Group Therapy: Pathways to Resolution

Complex Dilemmas in Group Therapy: Pathways to Resolution

A therapist working within the framework of psychodynamic psychotherapy has to concentrate not only on the patient’s story, but also needs to be aware of the ongoing transference and countertransference dynamic, projective identifications and other defense mechanisms. It makes the therapy process quite challenging for the psychotherapist. All these challenges multiply in a group setting, where the therapist has to be aware of the interactions between the clients and him or herself, but also between the clients. Not all... / more

How the Body Knows its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel

How the Body Knows its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel

Can Botox be used to treat depression? Can adopting a “power pose” make you feel more confident? Does carrying a grocery basket versus pushing a cart alter purchasing behavior? In How the Body Knows its Mind: The Surprising Power of the Physical Environment to Influence How You Think and Feel, Dr. Sian Beilock (also the author of Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When... / more

The cross-cultural psychology of Internet privacy concern

The cross-cultural psychology of Internet privacy concern

In a recent cross-cultural study of Facebook users in Japan and the US, I show that Japanese SNS users are more concerned about Internet privacy than American SNS users. And it turns out that because Americans have higher general trust, they less likely to believe that a stranger would take advantage of their private information, should it be leaked online. / more

From the Editors: Commentary for Mobility Special Issue

From the Editors: Commentary for Mobility Special Issue

Schug and Lu (this issue) present an overview of research on the similarity-attraction link, noting cultural differences in this phenomenon (e.g., in America & Japan).  They note that variables such as relational mobility and size of social network matter. They also note the dark side of having preferences for similarity in relationships, which can lead to segregation based on factors like race or education level. Another line of research...

/ more

How to win (and lose) friendships across cultures: Why relational mobility matters

How to win (and lose) friendships across cultures: Why relational mobility matters

Making and keeping friends: Strategy matters

Friendships can be tough work. Whether it’s making them or maintaining them, friendships usually require effort. If you’re from a Western country, this likely involves trusting and relying on others, and confidently communicating your strengths and your struggles. Let’s call these your strategies for relational success: Let people know what sort of friend you are, and you’ll increase your chances of finding and keeping a desirable friend. For a moment,... / more

Always on the Move: How Residential Mobility Impacts Our Well-Being

Always on the Move: How Residential Mobility Impacts Our Well-Being

John had just received a job offer from a company located in a big city. He was very excited about it and couldn’t wait to move there. He had been hearing a lot of vivid descriptions about the interesting life experiences he could have in the new city from his future colleagues, who have lived there for a couple of years. They told John that people in this big city are friendly, especially to the newcomers. Even...

/ more

Sex versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of Sabina Spielrein

Sex versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of Sabina Spielrein

The following review incorporates answers from Dr. John Launer, from an interview I conducted with him over email. I have included them within my review where appropriate, as I felt they added a new dimension to my own subjective thoughts.    To summarize, "Sex versus Survival: The Life and Ideas of SABINA SPIELREIN" is the biography of Sabina Spielrein, a scientist at the turn of the 20th century whose life and ideas... / more

Gender equity in science: Achievement unlocked?

Gender equity in science: Achievement unlocked?

Is it time to throw out our gender-equity-in-STEM training materials? Williams and Ceci (2015) reported that STEM faculty members have a preference for hiring women (not men), reigniting debates over equity in academic hiring. In our blog post, we add to a growing conversation among the scientific community that questions Williams & Ceci’s grand claim of a post-sexist era in academic hiring. / more

filter options

Article (125)
Blog Post (87)
Book Review (39)

facebook