101 - 110 of 257 articles

The missing heritability problem

The missing heritability problem

In my last post I described the transition from candidate gene studies to genome-wide association studies, and argued that the corresponding change in the methods used, focusing on the whole genome rather than on a handful of genes of presumed biological relevance, has transformed our understanding of the genetic basis of complex traits. In this post I discuss the reasons why, despite this success, we still have not accounted for all the genetic influences we expect to find. / more

How stress influences our morality

How stress influences our morality

All of us are stressed every now and then. There are phenomena we usually associate with stress, like health risks and feelings like fear, panic, or insecurity. But stress might also have effects we normally don’t think of; recent studies suggest it can dramatically influence our decision-making in a number of—perhaps unexpected—ways. This becomes particularly relevant in the moral context: people who are put under stress behave more compassionately in some situations, yet the opposite can be...

/ more

When science selects for fraud

When science selects for fraud

Are fraud and other questionable practices in science caused by a few bad apples, or a culture that rewards based on results, not rigor? In this post, I will argue that our scientific environment is selecting for the wrong kind of scientist. / more

The influential child: It is not all up to the parents

The influential child: It is not all up to the parents

A classic answer to the "what stirred development to the wrong track" question, is parenting; Why am I so anxious? My parents did not love me enough. Why am I violent? My parents were not strict enough. Why am I an overachiever? My parents put a lot of emphasis on grades. Why am I insecure? My parents did not give me enough compliments. Citing parenting style as the all-inclusive cause for how children turn out is a popular stance, even... / more

The influential child: It is not all up to the parents

The influential child: It is not all up to the parents

A classic answer to the "what stirred development to the wrong track" question, is parenting; Why am I so anxious? My parents did not love me enough. Why am I violent? My parents were not strict enough. Why am I an overachiever? My parents put a lot of emphasis on grades. Why am I insecure? My parents did not give me enough compliments. Citing parenting style as the all-inclusive cause for how children turn out is a popular stance, even... / more

The reason that you need to feel good about yourself in order to be happy might not be what you think it is

The reason that you need to feel good about yourself in order to be happy might not be what you think it is

Do you feel the need to feel good about yourself in order to be happy? Research suggests that if you have a lot of opportunities to make new friends, it is more likely that you will answer this question with a ‘yes’ than when you have more of a set group of people you spend time with. In this blog, I will describe the recent research on the influence of relational mobility and how it relates to the way in which we develop our self-esteem and happiness. / more

Patriot Acts: Why the USA’s recent decrease in national glorification might be a good sign

Patriot Acts: Why the USA’s recent decrease in national glorification might be a good sign

In this blog post, I share a recent report which says that Americans are less fervent about their country now than they’ve been in the recent past. However, I also review some political psychology research on different styles of patriotism which suggests that this particular type of decrease might actually be a good thing for Americans. / more

When having meaning in life helps – and why

When having meaning in life helps – and why

This blog examines the search for meaning in life and gives an explanation for why people seek meaning. Briefly, modern life (relative to our hunter-gatherer past) places people in an uncertain position, and meaning in life can give us a sense that difficulties in life will pay-off. / more

Look at me! (Or don’t): Of society and showing off on Facebook

Look at me! (Or don’t): Of society and showing off on Facebook

Shameless self-promotion on Facebook. Love it or hate it, there’s always someone doing it. And many of us are guilty of it. But why do we do it? Comparing Facebook users in the US and Japan, I suggest it’s the power of the social context that may determine who struts their stuff, and why. / more

Can you replicate that?

Can you replicate that?

The two previous “Solid Science” posts for this blog have covered important changes taking place in experimental psychology. If you have not read them, I recommend you do. In this post I report on another, larger change occurring in the field: the replication movement. / more

filter options

Article (128)
Blog Post (89)
Book Review (43)

facebook